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Fetching My Starred Items from Spotify

I wrote a quick demo that shows how to create a web app that fetches the starred items for a Spotify user via the nifty new Spotify Web API.  The demo will first solicit permission from the user, and if the user grants such permissions, the app will then retrieved the starred list and show the tracks in a simple list.


The online demo is here: My Starred ItemsThe source is on github.


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The Set Listener

Going to a show? Not totally familiar with an artist’s catalog? Give The Set Listener a try.  The Set Listener is a web app that will create a Spotify playlist of an artist’s most recent show.




To use The Set Listener just type in the artist name, and hit the search button, you’ll be presented with a playlist of songs from that artist’s most recent show.  Hit the ‘Save this playlist to Spotify’ button and you’ll have a Spotify playlist that you can listen to on your desktop or on your mobile phone.

The app relies on the API and the brand new and super spiffy Spotify Web API. Now that the Spotify Web API supports the creation and saving of playlists creating these types of apps is quite straightforward – just a few hours of coding. This was my first time using the API – its a super resource for setlists from concerts by thousands of artists.

Check out the app online at The Set Listener.  The code is online on github.


My new superpower – creating Spotify playlists from a web app

labs_echonest_com_CityServer_callback_html_access_token_BQBcbPg0FicOcTQ2Epc5XxGkMNuQPU4LA-ou9LP0lo7qx-4FNd7QlJNXtXziRF04gPtbATfmh9Xe25vJeUVrOQLOrhpQi4La3jT6dEUc7XHD_7iB9oStWBN9PuNGoWB_WKg8goz92CQpYHVM50z_wjY_token_type_Bearer_expires_in_360The new Spotify Web API allows the developer to create and add tracks to a playlist on behalf of a listener. This is a pretty powerful feature, opening the door for a whole range of apps. For instance, this weekend, I added the ability to save a Roadtrip Mixtape playlist, so you can now actually take your mixtapes on the road.   The code is on github if  you are interested in seeing how it is done.


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The Echo Nest + Spotify Sandbox

I am wearing my International Executive Music Hacker hat today. I’m writing this blog post at 5AM somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, on my way to the Barcelona Music Hack Day, where I’ll be representing both The Echo Nest and Spotify. I’m pretty excited about the hack event – first, because it’s in freaking Barcelona, and second, because I get to talk about what’s been going on with the Spotify and Echo Nest APIs.


It has been just about 100 days since The Echo Nest and Spotify have joined forces. In that time we’ve been working hard to build the best music platform for listeners and for developers. This week we are releasing some of the very first fruits of our labors.

First up, we are releasing a new Spotify Web API.

This is a complete revamp of the Spotify Metadata API (the old version has now been deprecated). The Spotify Web API gives you access to all sorts of information about the Spotify catalog including details about artists, albums and tracks. Want to know the top tracks for an artist? There’s an API for that. Looking for high quality album art, artist images and 30 second audio previews? There are APIs for that too. Best of all, the new API includes perhaps the most requested Spotify API feature of all time With the Spotify Web API you can now create and modify playlists on behalf of authenticated users. Yes – you can now create a Spotify web app that creates playlists. (I personally requested this feature way back in 2008, here’s my begging plea for the feature in 2009).

static_echonest_com_SpotifyPopcorn_I’ve been using the beta version of this new API for a couple months now and I must say I am quite impressed. The API is fast, super easy to use, and provides all sorts of great data for building apps. In the past weeks I’ve had fun converting a number of my favorite apps to use the Spotify API. First there’s the Road Trip Mix Tape that lets you create a Spotify playlist of music by artists that are from the very towns you are driving through. Then there’s Music Popcorn, a visual interface for exploring genres. For the less visual, there’s the Genre Browser that gives you lots of details about the different music genres including playlists that help give you a gentle introduction to any of the thousands of Echo Nest genres. Next there’s Boil the Frog, an app that creates seamless playlists between any two artists. Finally there’s the 3D Music Maze, an app that lets you explore for music by wandering through a 3 dimensional music world.

Next up, a freshly minted Echo Nest + Spotify Sandbox — a new Spotify ID space.

180px-Rosetta_Stone_BW.jpegThese apps are possible because of the second thing we are releasing this week – a spiffy, shiny new Spotify Rosetta Stone catalog that ensures that the Echo Nest API has the freshest, and most up-to-date view of the Spotify universe of music. For those who might be new to The Echo Nest, Project Rosetta Stone is something we’ve been working on here at the Nest for many years. The goal of Project Rosetta Stone is to solve one of the most common problems that nearly every music app developer faces. The problem is that every music service has its own set of IDs – a music subscription service like Spotify has its own artist, album and track IDs. A lyric service has its own (and very different) IDs for those same artists, albums and tracks and a concert ticketing API has yet a third set of IDs. This is quite problematic for app developers that want to build an app that combines information from multiple services. Without a common ID system, the app developer has to resort to metadata searching and matching – which is slow and quite error prone – this results in a poor app.

Project Rosetta Stone solves this problem by providing ID mappings between as many music services as we can. With this mapping you can easily translate IDs from one ID space to another. With Rosetta Stone, if you have the Spotify track ID you can get Lyricfind and/or Musixmatch IDs making it easy to use those respective APIs to retrieve lyrics for that song. You can easily map the Spotify artist ID to a Songkick or Eventful ID to get ticket and touring information from those APIs. And of course you can use the Spotify track ID to get detailed Echo Nest information about the song such as its tempo, energy, danceability, along with detailed Echo Nest artist data such as latest artist news, blog posts and similar artists.

We have had Spotify IDs in Rosetta Stone for many years, but this particular mapping has in the past been problematic for us. Spotify has a huge catalog and keeping the mapping fresh and up to date between Spotify and The Echo Nest has always been a big challenge. There’s a huge back catalog with millions of tracks to deal with plus thousands of new tracks are being added every week. The result was that there was always a bit of a lag between when updates to the Spotify catalog were reflected in the Rosetta Stone mapping. This meant that if you built a Rosetta Stone-based app you could find that The Echo Nest wouldn’t always know about a Spotify track, especially if a track was very new. The result would be a less-than-perfect app.

This week we are releasing a new Spotify ID space. Our engineers have been working hard over the last 100 days to set up all sorts of infrastructure and plumbing to ensure that we have the most up-to-date view of the Spotify catalog. No more lag between when a new track appears in Spotify and when you can get Echo Nest data. Plus, all of our APIs that take IDs as inputs will now also take Spotify IDs as input as well. If you have a Spotify artist ID you can use it with any Echo Nest artist API method. Likewise, if you have a Spotify track ID you can use it with any Echo Nest song or track API method that takes a track ID as input. This makes it **really** easy for developers to use The Echo Nest and Spotify Apps together. For example, here’s an API call that returns detailed audio properties for a Spotify track given its ID.

I’ve been having much fun using The Echo Nest API with the brand new Spotify API. I’ve already written some code that you can use. First, I wrote a Python library for Spotify called Spotipy. It’s makes it easy to write Python programs that use the new Spotify Web API, and it works well with my Echo Nest Python library called Pyen. Here’s an example of using the two libraries together:

I’ve also put together a number of Javascript example apps that use both APIs. These are simple apps intended to help new developers (or at least new to music apps) use the APIs together to do common things like create chillout playlists, browse through the web of similar artists, and more.

So yes, I’m pretty jazzed about this trip to Barcelona. I get to create a music hack, I get to spend a few days with some of the best music hackers in the world (The Barcelona Music Hack Day, as part of the Sonar Festival tends to attract the top music hackers). I get to spend a few days on the Mediterranean in one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Best of all, I get to talk about the new Spotify and Echo Nest developer platform and help music hackers build cool stuff on top of the newly combined platform.

I’ve put together a page that talks in detail about the new Spotify / Echo Nest platform. It has links to all of the API docs, libraries, examples, github repos, demos and details on how you can use The Echo Nest / Spotify Platform. Check it out here:


Keep an eye on this space for I’ll be updating it as we continue to integrate our developer APIs. There’s lots more coming, so stay tuned!


Minimizing my Karaoke pain

Rumor has it from some of the Echo Nest gang that went to Stockholm last week for new employee orientation that there is some sort of mandatory Karaoke requirement.  Now for some, I’m sure this is great fun, but for others, like myself, not so much.  I thought it would be best to prepare for my own mandatory Karaoke by finding some very short songs in order to minimize my time on stage.   To do this I went through  a database of the top Billboard songs of the last 60 years to find the shortest songs.   Here are some of the top shortest popular songs of the last 60 years:

Length(Seconds) Artist/Title Date
76 Anna Kendrick Cups 2013-01-14
78 Zac Efron What I’ve Been Looking For (Reprise) 2006-02-13
83 Buchanan & Goodman Santa And The Satellite (Part I) 1957-12-25
92 Audrey Dear Elvis (Page 1) 1956-09-24
96 Fats Domino Whole Lotta Loving 1958-11-19
98 Glee Cast Isn’t She Lovely 2011-05-30
99 Maurice Williams & The Zodiacs Stay 1960-10-05
101 Swinging Blue Jeans, The Hippy Hippy Shake 1964-03-09
103 Peter, Paul & Mary Settle Down (Goin’ Down That Highway) 1963-01-21
105 Four Tops Ain’t That Love 1965-08-02
105 Fats Domino Shu Rah 1961-03-22
105 Chuck Berry Let It Rock 1960-02-03
107 Lucas Gabreel & Ashley Tisdale Bop To The Top 2006-02-13
107 Beach Boys, The Little Deuce Coupe 1963-08-19
107 Clyde McPhatter Lover Please 1962-03-05
108 Ventures, The Hawaii Five-O 1969-03-10
110 Glee Cast Sing! 2010-11-01
110 Glee Cast It’s My Life / Confessions Part II 2009-10-26
110 Ricky Nelson If You Can’t Rock Me 1963-04-22

So it looks like my minimum possible karaoke pain will be 76 seconds if I go with Anna Kendrick’s Cups. Certainly better than Gun’s in Roses November Rain at 8:57 seconds or  Don Mclean’s American Pie at 6:49. But better yet, I can go with Hawaii Five-O . That song is not only short, but has no vocals.  With that song I’m sure to be pitch perfect!



Spotify iOS token exchange service in python

On the very same day that Spotify announced its acquisition of The Echo Nest they released a brand new Spotify iOS SDK.  Trying this new SDK out has been high on my priority list, and finally after a few crazy weeks I’ve had a bit of time to take it for a test drive.  I walked through the beginner’s tutorial and was up and running with an iOS app running in the simulator in about 30 minutes. Easy Peazy! The bit that took the longest was setting up the token exchange service. This is a service that you need to run on your own server as part of the authentication process. The tutorial provides such a sample service written in ruby, however I’m not a ruby programmer so I had to go through all the gyrations of installing ruby, figuring out how to install gems and getting the required gems installed. Once I had everything installed it worked fine and I was able to get the tutorial running. However, I figure that I’ll be working with the iOS SDK a great deal in my future, and I’d rather not have to deal with a ruby server every time I create a new app, and so for my Sunday morning programming project I’ve re-written the ruby swap service in python. The service is on github here: spotify_token_swap

If you are going to be using the new Spotify iOS SDK to create apps and you’d rather deal with python than ruby, then you might find it useful.

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Echo Nest Radio on Spotify


I work for Spotify now – so for my Sunday morning programming project I thought I’d write a simple Spotify App that uses The Echo Nest API to create playlists based upon a seed song. I’ve done this before, but the last time was a few years ago and the Spotify Apps API has changed quite a bit since then, so I thought I’d use this as an opportunity to freshen my understanding of the Spotify API as well as to demonstrate how to write a Spotify App that uses The Echo Nest API.

I created an Echo Nest Radio app – it is a very simple app – it looks at what song you are currently playing and will generate an Echo Nest playlist based upon that seed song. The code is pretty straightforward. It grabs the Now Playing track from Spotify, gets the track’s ID and uses that as a seed for The Echo Nest song-radio static playlist API. This call returns Spotify track IDs (thanks to our Rosetta Stone ID mapping layer) that are then tossed into a temporary playlist, which is used to build a List view which is then displayed in the app. All told it is just over 100 lines of Javascript.

It did take me a bit of time to get the hang of the newer Spotify Apps API. It has changed quite a bit since I last used it and many of the examples that I relied on in the past, like Peter Watt’s excellent Kitchen Sink app, use an older version of the API. The new version has some significant changes including a nifty new module system along with a new approach to managing long-running queries that relies on promises. Once I got the hang of it, I decided that I like the new version – it makes for cleaner code and a much more efficient app since much less data needs to be moved around.

The app is on github – to use it you need to sign up for a developer account on Spotify and follow the rest of the Getting Started instructions (this means if you are not a developer, you’ll probably not be able to use the app).

The Spotify Apps API makes it super easy to be able to create apps that run inside Spotify. Its a very familiar programming environment for anyone who has done web programming. You can use all of your favorite libraries from jQuery to Lo-Dash to create really compelling apps that sit on top of the millions and millions of tracks in the Spotify catalog. However, unlike a web app where anyone can publish their app on the web, to publish a Spotify App you have to submit your app to the Spotify App approval process and only apps that Spotify approves are published. Spotify sets a high bar for what ultimately gets approved – which keeps the quality of the apps high, but also means that hacks and experiments built on the Spotify Apps platform will likely never be approved for release to the general public.  It’s a difficult balancing act for Spotify. They’ve built the ultimate music hacking platform with this API, but if they open the doors to every music hack, they will ultimately dilute the listening experience of the user – like so other many App stores that are flooded with garbage apps,  if they publish every app and hack then Spotify listeners would be inundated with the musical equivalent of flashlight and fart apps.  With the approval process, Spotify essentially says ‘the listener comes first’ which is the right choice.   Still, as a music hacker I do wish it was easier to publish rich music apps built on the Spotify platform. Luckily Spotify is committed to building an active and vibrant developer ecosystem so I don’t expect they we will be standing still.

Update 3/24/14: – I’ve added the ability to save these playlists back to Spotify, so you can take the Echo Nest radio playlists with you.

Second update 3/24/14 – note that Spotify’s recent announcement that they are closing app submissions means that you won’t be able to submit apps for publishing anymore, but you should be able to still create your own.

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